The Five: Shapers of Our History
Home BlogProgram NewsThe Five: Shapers of Our History
no image

The Five: Shapers of Our History

The following is a special needs program update from Home. You may also click here to read the original article on the program’s website.

Normal
0

false
false
false

EN-US
JA
X-NONE



/* Style Definitions */
table.MsoNormalTable
{mso-style-name:”Table Normal”;
mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0;
mso-tstyle-colband-size:0;
mso-style-noshow:yes;
mso-style-priority:99;
mso-style-parent:””;
mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt;
mso-para-margin-top:0in;
mso-para-margin-right:0in;
mso-para-margin-bottom:10.0pt;
mso-para-margin-left:0in;
line-height:115%;
mso-pagination:widow-orphan;
font-size:11.0pt;
font-family:”Calibri”,”sans-serif”;
mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri;
mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin;
mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri;
mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin;}

Autism isn’t a new condition; it’s simply a recent discovery. The term Asperger’s Syndrome, for example, didn’t exist until 1944, and the term is not likely to be in use much longer,  but individuals have had the condition since long before that. In fact, a  number of scientists speculate that some key players in human history, though never officially diagnosed, probably had Asperger’s or another learning difference. Here are five brilliant historical figures that showed signs of Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD).

 

Normal
0

false
false
false

EN-US
JA
X-NONE



/* Style Definitions */
table.MsoNormalTable
{mso-style-name:”Table Normal”;
mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0;
mso-tstyle-colband-size:0;
mso-style-noshow:yes;
mso-style-priority:99;
mso-style-parent:””;
mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt;
mso-para-margin-top:0in;
mso-para-margin-right:0in;
mso-para-margin-bottom:10.0pt;
mso-para-margin-left:0in;
line-height:115%;
mso-pagination:widow-orphan;
font-size:11.0pt;
font-family:”Calibri”,”sans-serif”;
mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri;
mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin;
mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri;
mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin;}