CIP National’s Graphic Design Intern, Brendan, Visits the Norman Rockwell Museum
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CIP National’s Graphic Design Intern, Brendan, Visits the Norman Rockwell Museum

Brendan at the Norman Rockwell Museum

Hello, my name is Brendan “Mike” Copeland and this blog post about my visit to the Norman Rockwell Museum in Stockbridge, MA. Norman Rockwell was a famous illustrator who created images for The Saturday Evening Post. His paintings are known for their simplicity and highlights what was going on in american culture at the time. One major event that affected his work was the Second World War. His paintings were heavily inspired by President Roosevelt in this time. He would keep on painting even up until he died on November 8, 1978. Even though he is not with us today, we can still enjoy the wonderful art he left us. I am now going to write about some of the pieces I enjoyed.

The Golden Rule / image via The Norman Rockwell Museum

The first piece of art I will be writing about is the piece called “Golden Rule”. This painting was painted in 1961. The image displays a group of people of different races looking very peaceful, as well as text that simply says the words, “Do unto others as you would have them do unto you.” To me, the message is something we can all relate to where ever you come from, and even to this day still holds true. My interpretation of the message is: have peace and love between anyone of any race. A beautiful message which holds true even now as much as it was the day it was painted.

The second piece of art I will be writing about is the piece called “The Marriage License”. This painting was painting in 1955. The image shows a couple signing a marriage form in a very dark room at a desk where an older grumpy man and a cat sitting near an open window on a lovely summer day. The open window is a contrast to the dark feel of the room. The sense I get from the older gentlemen is that he disapproves of the marriage. But the one thing I like in particular about this photo it’s like this is a snapshot of everyday life of the average person. Very simple but very happy.

The third piece of art I will be writing about is the piece called “Girl at Mirror”. This painting was painted in 1954. The image shows a little girl holding a picture of someone who looks like a supermodel, with a little doll on the side. My interpretation of this piece of art is about a young woman reflecting on on herself and becoming a woman. A lot of adults can relate into this. All of us at one time or another reflected on the changes that are about to happen as we develop into adults and lose the innocence that we had as children. And that is what makes me like this photo: the relatability and the message of personal growth.

The fourth piece of art I will be writing about is the piece called “The Gossips”. This painting was painted in 1958. The image shows a group of people talking to each other and spreading gossip all around. Even though it is almost 60 years old, it’s still true that gossip spreads like wildfire. And I personally really enjoy this photo because it is one of my favorites of his.

Overall I will say my trip to the Norman Rockwell Museum was a successful trip. I enjoyed it greatly because I got to experience time travel, if you will. It felt like a time that was much simpler and much richer, shown by the paintings. I hope you enjoyed reading my blog posts and I hope you have a nice day.

Brendan at the Norman Rockwell Museum
Brendan at the Norman Rockwell Museum
Brendan at the Norman Rockwell Museum

This has been a special needs program update from Asperger’s & LD College Programs. You may also click here to read the original article on the main program website.